Saturday, June 24, 2006

Our bad - our most common infractions

These are the most common infractions that occur in our league (penalties as defined in the 2009-2010 NHL rule book):

Cross-checking (Rule 59)
The action of using the shaft of the stick between the two hands to forcefully check an opponent. (This is rare in our league, but does happen occasionally; the perpetrator usually claims there was none, while the recipient is rubbing his back or chest).

Holding (Rule 54)
Holding – Any action by a player or goalkeeper that retards the progress of an opposing player whether or not he is in possession of the puck.

54.2 Minor Penalty - A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player or goalkeeper who holds an opponent by using his hands, arms or legs.

A player or goalkeeper is permitted to use his arm in a strength move, by blocking his opponent, provided he has body position and is not using his hands in a holding manner, when doing so.

A player or goalkeeper is not permitted to hold an opponent’s stick. A minor penalty shall be assessed to a player or goalkeeper who holds an opponent’s stick (assessed and announced as “holding the stick”).

A player is permitted to protect himself by defending against an opponent’s stick. He must immediately release the stick and allow the player to resume normal play.

Hooking (Rule 55)
Hooking is the act of using the stick in a manner that enables a player or goalkeeper to restrain an opponent.

When a player is checking another in such a way that there is only stick-to-stick contact, such action is not to be penalized as hooking.

55.2 Minor Penalty - A minor penalty shall be imposed on a player or goalkeeper who impedes the progress of an opponent by “hooking” with his stick. A minor penalty for hooking shall be assessed to any player or goalkeeper who uses the shaft of the stick above the upper hand to hold or hook an opponent.

Interference (Rule 56)
56.1 Interference - A strict standard on acts of interference must be adhered to in all areas of the rink.

Body Position: Body position shall be determined as the player skating in front of or beside his opponent, traveling in the same direction. A player who is behind an opponent, who does not have the puck, may not use his stick, body or free hand in order to restrain his opponent, but must skate in order to gain or reestablish his proper position in order to make a check.

A player is allowed the ice he is standing on (body position) and is not required to move in order to let an opponent proceed. A player may “block” the path of an opponent provided he is in front of his opponent and moving in the same direction. Moving laterally and without establishing body position, then making contact with the non-puck carrier is not permitted and will be penalized as interference. A player is always entitled to use his body position to lengthen an opponent’s path to the puck, provided his stick is not utilized (to make himself “bigger” and therefore considerably lengthening the distance his opponent must travel to get where he is going); his free hand is not used and he does not take advantage of his body position to deliver an otherwise illegal check.

Possession of the Puck:

The last player to touch the puck, other than the goalkeeper, shall be considered the player in possession. The player deemed in possession of the puck may be checked legally, provided the check is rendered immediately following his loss of possession.

Tripping (Rule 57)
A player or goalkeeper shall not place the stick, knee, foot, arm, hand or elbow in such a manner that causes his opponent to trip or fall.

Accidental trips which occur simultaneously with a completed play will not be penalized. Accidental trips occurring simultaneously with or after a stoppage of play will not be penalized.

If, in the opinion of the Referee, a player makes contact with the puck first and subsequently trips the opponent in so doing, no penalty shall be assessed.

Slashing (Rule 61)
Slashing is the act of a player or goalkeeper swinging his stick at an opponent, whether contact is made or not. Non-aggressive stick contact to the pant or front of the shin pads, should not be penalized as slashing. Any forceful or powerful chop with the stick on an opponent’s body, the opponent’s stick, or on or near the opponent’s hands that, in the judgment of the Referee, is not an attempt to play the puck, shall be penalized as slashing.

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